Motivational Readings

Instructions for Life in the new millennium from the Dalai Lama:

1. Take into account that great love and great achievements involve great risk. 2. When you lose, don't lose the lesson.
3. Follow the three R's:
  * Respect for self
  * Respect for others and
  * Responsibility for all your actions.
4. Remember that not getting what you want is sometimes a wonderful stroke of luck.
5. Learn the rules so you know how to break them properly. 6. Don't let a little dispute injure a great friendship.
7. When you realize you've made a mistake,
take immediate steps to correct it.
8. Spend some time alone every day.
9. Open your arms to change, but don't let go of your values.
10. Remember that silence is sometimes the best answer.
11. Live a good, honorable life. Then when you get older and think back, you'll be able to enjoy it a second time. 12. A loving atmosphere in your home is the foundation for your life.
13. In disagreements with loved ones, deal only with the current situation. Don't bring up the past. 14. Share your knowledge. It's a way to achieve immortality.
15. Be gentle with the earth. 16. Once a year, go someplace you've never been before.
17. Remember that the best relationship is one in which your love for each other exceeds your need for each other. 18. Judge your success by what you had to give up in order to get it.
19. Approach love and cooking with reckless abandon.

THE OLD FISHERMAN
Our house was directly across the street from the clinic entrance of Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. We lived downstairs and rented the upstairs rooms to out patients at the clinic. One summer evening as I was fixing supper, there was a knock at the door.
I opened it to see a truly awful looking man. "Why, he's hardly taller than my eight-year-old," I thought as I stared at the stooped, shriveled body. But the appalling thing was his face-lopsided from swelling, red and raw. Yet his voice was pleasant as he said, "Good evening.
I've come to see if you've a room for just one night. I came for a treatment this morning from the eastern shore, and there's no bus 'till morning." He told me he'd been hunting for a room since noon but with no success, no one seemed to have a room. "I guess it's my face...I know it looks terrible, but my doctor says with a few more treatments..." For a moment I hesitated, but his next words convinced me:"I could sleep in this rocking chair on the porch. My bus leaves early in the morning." I told him we would find him a bed, but to rest on the porch. I went inside and finished getting supper.
When we were ready, I asked the old man if he would join us. "No thank you. I have plenty." And he held up a brown paper bag. When I had finished the dishes, I went out on the porch to talk with him a few minutes.
It didn't take long to see that this old man had an oversized heart crowded into that tiny body. He told me he fished for a living to support his daughter, her five children, and her husband, who was hopelessly crippled from a back injury. He didn't tell it by way of complaint; in fact, every other sentence was prefaced with a thanks to God for a blessing. He was grateful that no pain accompanied his disease, which was apparently a form of skin cancer. He thanked God for giving him the strength to keep going.
At bedtime, we put a camp cot in the children's room for him. When I got up in the morning, the bed linens were neatly folded and the little man was out on the porch. He refused breakfast, but just before he left for his bus, haltingly, as if asking a great favor, he said, "Could I please come back and stay the next time I have a treatment? I won't put you out a bit. I can sleep fine in a chair." He paused a moment and then added, "Your children made me feel at home. Grownups are bothered by my face, but children don't seem to mind." I told him he was welcome to come again.
And on his next trip he arrived a little after seven in the morning. As a gift, he brought a big fish and a quart of the largest oysters I had ever seen. He said he had shucked them that morning before he left so that they'd be nice and fresh. I knew his bus left at 4:00 a.m. and I wondered what time he had to get up in order to do this for us. In the years he came to stay overnight with us there was never a time that he did not bring us fish or oysters or vegetables from his garden.
Other times we received packages in the mail, always by special delivery; fish and oysters packed in a box of fresh young spinach or kale, every leaf carefully washed. Knowing that he must walk three miles to mail these, and knowing how little money he had made the gifts doubly precious.
When I received these little remembrances, I often thought of a comment our next-door neighbor made after he left that first morning, "Did you keep that awful looking man last night? I turned him away! You can lose roomers by putting up such people!"
Maybe we did lose roomers once or twice. But oh! If only they could have known him, perhaps their illness' would have been easier to bear. I know our family always will be grateful to have known him; from him we learned what it was to accept the bad without complaint and the good with gratitude to God.
Recently I was visiting a friend who has a greenhouse, as she showed me her flowers, we came to the most beautiful one of all, a golden chrysanthemum, bursting with blooms. But to my great surprise,it was growing in an old dented, rusty bucket. I thought to myself, "If this were my plant, I'd put it in the loveliest container I had!" My friend changed my mind. "I ran short of pots," she explained, "and knowing how beautiful this one would be, I thought it wouldn't mind starting out in this old pail. It's just for a little while, till I can put it out in the garden."
She must have wondered why I laughed so delightedly, but I was imagining just such a scene in heaven. "Here's an especially beautiful one," God might have said when he came to the soul of the sweet old fisherman, "He won't mind starting in this small body."
All this happened long ago-and now, in God's garden, how tall this lovely soul must stand.

The LORD does not look at the things man looks at. "Man looks at the outward appearance, but the LORD looks at the heart." (1 Samuel 16:7b)

BILL OF NO RIGHTS....
We, the sensible people of the United States, in an attempt to help everyone get along, restore some semblance of justice, avoid any more riots, keep our nation safe, promote positive behavior and secure the blessings of debt-free liberty to ourselves and our great-great-great grandchildren, hereby try one more time to ordain and establish some common sense guidelines for the terminally whiny, guilt-ridden, delusional and other liberal bedwetters.
We hold these truths to be self-evident: that a whole lot of people were confused by the Bill of Rights and are so dim that they require a Bill of No Rights.
ARTICLE I:
You do not have the right to a new car, big screen TV or any other form of wealth. More power to you if you can legally acquire them, but no one is guaranteeing anything.
ARTICLE II:
You do not have the right to never be offended. This country is based on freedom, and that means freedom for everyone - not just you! You may leave the room, turn the channel, express a different opinion, etc., but the world is full of idiots, and probably always will be.
ARTICLE III:
You do not have the right to be free from harm. If you stick a screwdriver in your eye, learn to be more careful, do not expect the tool manufacturer to make you and all your relatives independently wealthy.
ARTICLE IV:
You do not have the right to free food and housing. Americans are the most charitable people to be found, and will gladly help anyone in need, but we are quickly growing weary of subsidizing generation after generation of professional couch potatoes who achieve nothing more than the creation of another generation of professional couch potatoes.
ARTICLE V:
You do not have the right to free health care. That would be nice, but from the looks of public housing, we're just not interested in public health care.
ARTICLE VI:
You do not have the right to physically harm other people. If you kidnap, rape, intentionally maim or kill someone, don't be surprised if the rest of us want to see you fry in the electric chair.
ARTICLE VII:
You do not have the right to the possessions of others. If you rob, cheat or coerce away the goods or services of other citizens, don't be surprised if the rest of us get together and lock you away in a place where you still won't have the right to a big-screen color TV or a life of leisure.
ARTICLE VIII:
You don't have the right to demand that our children risk their lives in foreign wars to soothe your aching conscience. We hate oppressive governments and won't lift a finger to stop you from going to fight if you'd like; however, we do not enjoy parenting the entire world, and do not want to spend so much of our time battling each and every little tyrant with a military uniform and a funny hat.
ARTICLE IX:
You don't have the right to a job. All of us sure want all of you to have one, and will gladly help you along in hard times, but we expect you to take advantage of the opportunities of education and vocational training laid before you to make yourself useful.
ARTICLE X:
You do not have the right to happiness. Being an American means that you have the right to pursue happiness - which by the way, is a lot easier if you are unencumbered by an over abundance of idiotic laws created by those of you who were confused by the Bill of Rights. If You Agree, We Strongly Urge You To Forward This To As Many People As You Can. No, you don't have to, and nothing tragic will befall you should you not forward it. We just think it is about time common sense is allowed to flourish.
--Written by State Representative Mitchell Kaye of Cobb County, GA.



A BEAUTIFUL STORY:
A woman came out of her house and saw 3 old men with long white beards sitting in her front yard. She did not recognize them. She said "I don't think I know you, but you must be hungry. Please come in and have something to eat."
"Is the man of the house home?", they asked.
"No," she said. "He's out."
"Then we cannot come in," they replied.
In the evening when her husband came home, she told him what had happened.
"Go tell them I am home and invite them in!"
The woman went out and invited the men in.
"We do not go into a House together," they replied.
"Why is that?" she wanted to know.
One of the old men explained: "His name is Wealth," he said pointing to one of his friends, and said pointing to another one, He is Success, and I am Love." Then he added, " Now go in and discuss with your husband which one of us you want in your home."
The woman went in and told her husband what was said. Her husband was overjoyed. "How nice!!," he said. "Since that is the case, let us invite Wealth. Let him come and fill our home with wealth!"
His wife disagreed. "My dear, why don't we invite Success?"
Their daughter-in-law was listening from the other corner of the house. She jumped in with her own suggestion: "Would it not be better to invite Love? Our home will then be filled with love!"
Let us heed our daughter-in-law's advice," said the husband to his wife. "Go out and invite Love to be our guest."
The woman went out and asked the 3 old men, "Which one of you is Love? Please come in and be our guest."
Love got up and started walking toward the house. The other 2 also got up and followed him.
Surprised, the lady asked Wealth and Success: "I only invited Love, Why are you coming in?"
The old men replied together: "If you had invited Wealth or Success, the other two of us would've stayed out, but since you invited Love, wherever He goes, we go with him. Wherever there is Love, there is also Wealth and Success!!!!!!"

REASON, SEASON, or a LIFETIME

People come into your life for a REASON, a SEASON, or a LIFETIME. When you figure out which it is, you know exactly what to do.
When someone is in your life for a REASON, it is usually to meet a need you have expressed outwardly or inwardly. They have come to assist you through a difficulty, to provide you with guidance and support, to aid you physically, emotionally, or spiritually. They may seem like a godsend, and they are. They are there for the reason you need them to be. Then, without any wrong doing on your part or at an inconvenient time, this person will say or do something to bring the relationship to an end.
Sometimes they die. Sometimes they walk away. Sometimes they act up or out and force you to take a stand. What we must realize is that our need has been met, our desire fulfilled; their work is done. The prayer you sent up has been answered and it is now time to move on.
When people come into your life for a SEASON, it is because your turn has come to share, grow, or learn. They may bring you an experience of peace or make you laugh. They may teach you something you have never done. They usually give you an unbelievable amount of joy. Believe it! It is real! But, only for a season.
LIFETIME relationships teach you lifetime lessons; those things you must build upon in order to have a solid emotional foundation. Your job is to accept the lesson, love the person/people (anyway); and put what you have learned to use in all other relationships and areas of your life.

An Attitude of Gratitude
I am thankful:
for The Teenager Who Is Not Doing Dishes But Is Watching T.V., because That Means He Is At Home And Not On The Streets. for The Taxes That I Pay, because It Means That I Am Employed. for The Mess To Clean After A Party, because It Means That I Have Been Surrounded By Friends.
for The Clothes That Fit A Little Too Snug, because It Means I Have Enough To Eat. for My Shadow That Watches Me Work, because It Means I Am Out In The Sunshine. for A Lawn That Needs Mowing, Windows That Need Cleaning, And Gutters That Need Fixing, because It Means I Have A Home.
for All The Complaining I Hear About The Government, because It Means That We Have Freedom Of Speech. for The Parking Spot I Find At The Far End Of The Parking Lot, because It Means I Am Capable Of Walking And That I Have transportation. for My Huge Heating/cooling Bill, because It Means I Am Comfortable.
for The Pile Of Laundry And Ironing, because It Means I Have Clothes To Wear. for Weariness And Aching Muscles At The End Of The Day, because It Means I Have Been Capable Of Working Hard, for The Alarm That Goes Of In The Early Morning Hours, because It Means That I Am Alive.
and Finally.......
for Too Much E-mail, because It Means I Have Friends Who Are Thinking Of Me. :-)

My Resignation:
I am hereby officially tendering my resignation as an adult.
I have decided I would like to accept the responsibilities of a 5 
year old again.
I want to go to McDonald's and think that it's a four star restaurant.
I want to sail sticks across a fresh mud puddle and skip rocks 
on a pond.
I want to think M&Ms are better than money because you can eat them.
I want to lie under a big oak tree and watch the ants walk up it's trunk.
I want to think a quarter is more than a dollar bill cause it's 
prettier and weighs more.
I want to go fishing and care more about catching the minnows along the
shore than the big bass in the lake.
I want to return to a time when life was simple.  
When all you knew were colors, multiplication tables, and nursery rhymes.
 When all I knew was to be happy 
because I was blissfully unaware of all the things that should worry me.
I want to think the world is fair, and people are honest and good.
I want to be oblivious to the complexities of life and be overly excited 
by the little things again.
I don't want my day to consist of computer crashes, mountains of paperwork,
surviving more days in the month than there's money in the bank, 
doctor bills, gossip, illness, and losses of loved ones.
I want to believe in the power of smiles, hugs, a kind word, truth, 
dreams, imagination, a kiss that makes a boo boo go away, 
making angels in the snow.
So....here's my checkbook and my keys, credit cards and bills too, 
my 401K statements, my stocks and bonds, my collections, insurance premiums, 
job, house and the payments too, 
my email address, cell phone, computer, and watch.

I am officially resigning from adulthood.  
And if you want to discuss this with me further, 

you'll have to catch me first, cause, 
"Tag!"..."You're It!"

The secret of getting ahead is getting started. The
secret of getting started is breaking your complex
overwhelming tasks into small manageable tasks,
and then starting on the first one.
Mark Twain


True Faith
A kindergarten teacher was observing her classroom of children while they drew. She would occasionally walk around to see each child's artwork.
As she got to one little girl who was working diligently, she asked what the drawing was.
The girl replied, "I'm drawing God."
The teacher paused and said, "but no one knows what God looks like."
Without missing a beat, or looking up from her drawing the girl replied, "They will in a minute."

Angels

Two traveling angels stopped and spent the night at at rich family's house. The rude family refused to give them angels the mansion's guest room. Instead the angels shown to the cold basement.

Making their bed on the floor, the older angel saw & fixed a hole in the wall. When the younger angel asked why, the older angel replied... "Things aren't always what they seem."

The next night the pair stayed at the house of a very poor but warm and hospitable farmer and his wife. After sharing their small dinner, the farmers let the angels sleep in their bed and slept on the floor.

When the sun came up, the angels found them in tears. Their only milk cow, their sole income, lay dead in the field.

The younger angel was infuriated and said, "How could you let this happen!? The first family had everything, yet you helped him. These people have little but share everything joyfully, and you let their cow die."

"Things aren't always what they seem," the older angel replied. "When we stayed in the basement, I noticed there was gold stored in that hole. Since the owner was so obsessed with greed and unwilling to share his good fortune, I sealed the wall so he wouldn't find it. Last night as we slept in the farmer's bed, the angel of death came for his wife. I gave her the cow instead. Things aren't always what they seem."

Sometimes this is what happens when things don't go the way you think they should. If you have faith, you just need to trust that every outcome is always to your advantage whether you know that now or later.


The past exists only in our memories, the future only in our plans. The present is our only reality. -----Robert Pirsig

One set of footprints there was seen,
The footprints of my precious Lord, But mine were not along the shore.
But then some stranger prints appeared, And I asked the Lord, What have we here?
Those prints are large and round and neat, But Lord, they are too big for feet.
My child, He said in somber tones, For miles I carried you alone.
I challenged you to walk in faith, But you refused and made me wait.
You disobeyed, you would not grow, The walk of faith, you would not know,
So I got tired, I got fed up, And there I dropped you on your butt.
Because in life, there comes a time, When one must fight, and one must climb,
When one must rise and take a stand,
Or leave their butt prints in the sand.
--author unknown--
Stand Still.  The trees ahead and 
  the bushes beside you 
Are not lost.  Wherever you are is 
  called HERE.
    ~David Wagoner
One day a small opening appeared on a cocoon, a man sat & watched for the butterfly for several hours as it struggled to force it's body through that little hole. Then it seemed to stop making any progress. It appeared as if it had gotten as far as it could and it could go no further.
So the man decided to help the butterfly, he took a pair of scissors and snipped off the remaining bit of the cocoon. The butterfly then emerged easily, but it had a swollen body and shriveled wings.
The man cont'd to watch the butterfly because he expected at any moment, the wings would enlarge and expand to be able to support the body, which would contract in time. Neither happened! In fact, the butterfly spent the rest of it's life crawling around with a swollen body and shriveled wings.
What the man in his kindness and haste did not understand was that the restricting cocoon and the struggle required for the butterfly to get through the tiny opening were God's way of forcing fluid from the body of the butterfly into it's wings so that it would be ready for flight once it achieved its freedom from the cocoon.
Sometimes struggles are exactly what we need in our life. If God allowed us to go through life without any obstacles, it would cripple us. We would not be as strong as we could have been. We could never fly.
I asked for Strength....... And God gave me difficulties to make me strong.
I asked for Wisdom........ And God gave me problems to solve.
I asked for Prosperity...... And God gave me the brain and brawn to work.
I asked for Courage....... And God gave me danger to overcome.
I asked for Love...... And God gave me troubled people to help.
I asked for Favors...... And God gave me opportunities.
I received nothing I wanted I received everything I needed.
We spend our lives avoiding pain and suffering and seeking happiness. What if both were ok, not to be sought after or avoided, but simply experienced as they enter our lives?

WHY WORRY ?
In this life there are only two things to worry about.
Either you will be rich or poor.
If you are rich, there is nothing to worry about.
But if you are poor, there are only two things to worry about.
Either you will be healthy or sick.
If you are healthy, there is nothing to worry about.
But if you are sick, there are two things to worry about.
Either you will live or you will die.
If you live, there is nothing to worry about.
If you die there are only two things to worry about.
You will either go to heaven or to hell.
If you go to heaven, there will be nothing to worry about.
If you go to hell, you'll be so darn busy shaking hands with all your friends,
you won't have time to worry .

ADVICE, LIKE YOUTH,
PROBABLY JUST WASTED ON THE YOUNG
Mary Schmich
Inside every adult lurks a graduation speaker dying to get out, some world-weary pundit eager to pontificate on life to young people who'd rather be Rollerblading. Most of us, alas, will never be invited to sow our words of wisdom among an audience of caps and gowns, but there's no reason we can't entertain ourselves by composing a Guide to Life for Graduates.
I encourage anyone over 26 to try this and thank you for indulging my attempt.
Ladies and gentlemen of the class of '97:
Wear sunscreen.
If I could offer you only one tip for the future, sunscreen would be it. The long-term benefits of sunscreen have been proved by scientists, whereas the rest of my advice has no basis more reliable than my own meandering experience. I will dispense this advice now.
Enjoy the power and beauty of your youth. Oh, never mind. You will not understand the power and beauty of your youth until they've faded. But trust me, in 20 years, you'll look back at photos of yourself and recall in a way you can't grasp now how much possibility lay before you and how fabulous you really looked. You are not as fat as you imagine.
Don't worry about the future. Or worry, but know that worrying is as effective as trying to solve an algebra equation by chewing bubble gum. The real troubles in your life are apt to be things that never crossed your worried mind, the kind that blindside you at 4 p.m. on some idle Tuesday.
Do one thing every day that scares you.
Sing.
Don't be reckless with other people's hearts. Don't put up with people who are reckless with yours.
Floss.
Don't waste your time on jealousy. Sometimes you're ahead, sometimes you're behind. The race is long and, in the end, it's only with yourself.
Remember compliments you receive. Forget the insults. If you succeed in doing this, tell me how.
Keep your old love letters. Throw away your old bank statements.
Stretch.
Don't feel guilty if you don't know what you want to do with your life. The most interesting people I know didn't know at 22 what they wanted to do with their lives. Some of the most interesting 40-year-olds I know still don't.
Get plenty of calcium. Be kind to your knees. You'll miss them when they're gone.
Maybe you'll marry, maybe you won't. Maybe you'll have children, maybe you won't. Maybe you'll divorce at 40, maybe you'll dance the funky chicken on your 75th wedding anniversary. Whatever you do, don't congratulate yourself too much, or berate yourself either. Your choices are half chance. So are everybody else's.
Enjoy your body. Use it every way you can. Don't be afraid of it or of what other people think of it. It's the greatest instrument you'll ever own.
Dance, even if you have nowhere to do it but your living room.
Read the directions, even if you don't follow them.
Do not read beauty magazines. They will only make you feel ugly.
Get to know your parents. You never know when they'll be gone for good. Be nice to your siblings. They're your best link to your past and the people most likely to stick with you in the future.
Understand that friends come and go, but with a precious few you should hold on. Work hard to bridge the gaps in geography and lifestyle, because the older you get, the more you need the people who knew you when you were young.
Live in New York City once, but leave before it makes you hard. Live in Northern California once, but leave before it makes you soft.
Travel.
Accept certain inalienable truths: Prices will rise. Politicians will philander. You, too, will get old. And when you do, you'll fantasize that when you were young, prices were reasonable, politicians were noble and children respected their elders.
Respect your elders.
Don't expect anyone else to support you. Maybe you have a trust fund. Maybe you'll have a wealthy spouse. But you never know when either one might run out.
Don't mess too much with your hair or by the time you're 40 it will look 85.
Be careful whose advice you buy, but be patient with those who supply it. Advice is a form of nostalgia. Dispensing it is a way of fishing the past from the disposal, wiping it off, painting over the ugly parts and recycling it for more than it's worth.
But trust me on the sunscreen.

Happiness is a how, not a what;
a talent, not an object.
-- Hermann Hesse

Twenty-five things I have learned in 50 Years:
By Dave Barry
1. The badness of a movie is directly proportional to the number of helicopters in it.
*************************
2. You will never find anybody who can give you a clear and compelling reason why we observe daylight-saving time.
*************************
3. People who feel the need to tell you that they have an excellent sense of humor are telling you that they have no sense of humor.
*************************
4. The most valuable function performed by the federal government is entertainment.
*************************
5. You should never say anything to a woman that even remotely suggests you think she's pregnant unless you can see an actual baby emerging from her at that moment.
*************************
6. A penny saved is worthless.
*************************
7. They can hold all the peace talks they want, but there will never be peace in the Middle East. Billions of years from now, when the Earth is hurtling toward the sun and there is nothing left alive on the planet except a few micro-organisms, the micro-organisms living in the middle East will be bitter enemies.
*************************
8. The most powerful force in the universe is gossip.
*************************
9. The one thing that unites all human beings, regardless of age, gender, religion, economic status or ethnic background, is that, deep down inside, we all believe that we are above-average drivers.
*************************
10. There comes a time when you should stop expecting other people to make a big deal about your birthday. That time is: age 11.
*************************
11. There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness".
*************************
12. People who want to share their religious views with you almost never want you to share yours with them.
*************************
13. There apparently exists, somewhere in Los Angeles, a computer that generates concepts for television sitcoms. When TV executives need a new concept, they turn on this computer: after sorting through millions of possible plot premises, it spits out, "THREE QUIRKY BUT ATTRACTIVE YOUNG PEOPLE LIVING IN AN APARTMENT." And the executives turn its concept into a show. The next time they need an idea, the computer spits out, "SIX QUIRKY BUT ATTRACTIVE YOUNG PEOPLE LIVING IN AN APARTMENT." Then the next time it spits out, "FOUR QUIRKY BUT ATTRACTIVE YOUNG PEOPLE LIVING IN AN APARTMENT." And so on. We need to locate this computer and destroy it.
*************************
14. Nobody is normal.
*************************
15. At least once per year, some group of scientists will become very excited and announce that:
* The universe is even bigger than they thought!
* There are even more subatomic particles than they thought!
* Whatever they announced last year about global warming is wrong.
*************************
16. If you had to identify, in one word, the reason why the human race has not achieved, and never will achieve, its full potential, that word would be: "meetings".
*************************
17. The main accomplishment of almost all organized protests is to annoy people who are not in them.
*************************
18. The value of advertising is that it tells you the exact opposite of what the advertiser actually thinks. For example:
  * If the advertisement says "This is not your father's Oldsmobile," the advertiser is desperately concerned that this Oldsmobile , like all other Oldsmobiles, appeals primarily to old farts like your father.
  * If Coke and Pepsi spend billions of dollars to convince you that there are significant differences between these two products, both companies realize that Pepsi and Coke are virtually identical.
  * If the advertisement strongly suggests that Nike shoes enable athletes to perform amazing feats, Nike wants you to disregard the fact that shoe brand is unrelated to athletic ability.
  * If Budweiser runs an elaborate advertising campaign stressing the critical importance of a beer's "born-on" date, Budweiser knows this factor has virtually nothing to do with how good a beer tastes.
  * If an advertisement shows a group of cool, attractive youngsters getting excited and high-fiving each other because the refrigerator contains Sunny Delight, the advertiser knows that any real youngster who reacted this way to this beverage would be considered by his peers to be the world's biggest nerd.
  * And so on. On those rare occasions when advertising dares to poke fun at the product - as in the classic Volkswagen Beetle campaign - it's because the advertiser actually thinks the product is pretty good. If a politician ever ran for president under a slogan such as "Harlan Frubert: Basically, He Wants Attention," I would quit my job to work for his campaign.
*************************
19. If there really is a God who created the entire universe with all of its glories, and He decides to deliver a message to humanity, He will not use as His messenger, a person on cable TV with a bad hairstyle.
*************************
20. You should not confuse your career with your life.
*************************
21. A person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person.
*************************
22. No matter what happens, somebody will find a way to take it too seriously.
*************************
23. When trouble arises and things look bad, there is always one individual who perceives a solution and is willing to take command. Very often that individual is crazy.
*************************
24. Your friends love you, anyway.
*************************
25. Nobody cares if you can't dance well. Just get up and dance.